Thanksgiving Leftovers To Boost Your Health

Ahhhh the memories of a delicious meal shared by family and friends…..

Another Thanksgiving feast has come and gone and the annual tradition of eating leftovers for days has come to an end.  If you’re like me, you’re cleaning out your fridge.  Don’t throw out your herbs!

Many of the herbs commonly used in Thanksgiving meals contain health benefits for your health:

  • Oregano

    is high in vitamin K, which is a fat-soluble vitamin that helps protect your cardiovascular system and bone health.  Buying fresh oregano provides antibacterial and antioxidant properties along with minerals like iron and manganese.

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  • Parsley

    contains high values of vitamin K, C, and A.  It has a wonderfly cleansing taste to compliment it’s source of folic acid, which plays a huge role in cardiovascular health and proper cell division.  (That’s why pregnant women are encouraged to get enough folic acid.)  The vitamin C in parsley may even help reduce the inflammation of rheumatoid arthritis.

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  • Rosemary

    is an evergreen that grows year-round with health benefits like stimulating the immune system, increasing circulation, and improving digestion.  It’s anti-inflammatory properties may be helpful in reducing the severity of asthma attacks.  By increasing blood flow and improving circulation it may also help alleviate headaches and improve concentration.  Plus, the smell of rosemary is heavenly.

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  • Thyme

    has anti-septic, anti-viral, anti-rheumatic, anti-parasitic and anti-fungal properties like many of the other herbs mentioned, but it also has liver detoxification agents.

 

  • Sage

    20131201-204451.jpgis rich in antioxidants and vitamin K.  Like the other herbs mentioned, it is also an anti-inflammatory.  Additional research is required, but sage may help improve memory and information processing.  Sage is also being studied for its ability to help reduce cholesterol and triglycerides in people with Type II Diabetes.

Come back tomorrow for a post about how to store them for long-term easy storage.

 

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